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Anaideia (anaideia) wrote,
@ 2003-02-15 09:36:00
Previous Entry  Add to memories!  Add to Topic Directory  Tell a Friend!  Next Entry

    Current mood: awake

    I love you?
    I love you all over the world.

    Spanish: Te quiero or Te amo

    Norwegian: Jeg elsker deg

    Swedish: Jag älskar dig

    Russian: я тебя люблю

    Hebrew:
    (female to male): אני אוהבת אותך
    (male to female): אני אוהב אותך

    Philippines: In the three most spoken dialects
    Tagalog: Mahal kita.
    Cebuano: Gihigugma ta ikaw.
    Ilokano: Ay-ayatenka.

    Dutch: Ik hou van jou.
    Ik zie je graag.

    French: Je t'aime (I love you.)
    Je t'adore. (I adore you.)

    Esperanto: Mi amas vin.

    Latin: Te amo.

    Greek: Σ' αγαπώ (S'aghapó)

    German: Ich liebe dich!

    Bulgarian: Обичам те! (obicham te)

    Latvian: Es tevi mīlu!

    Polish: Kocham cię!

    Ukrainian: Я тебе кохаю! (ya tebe kokhayu)

    Vietnamese: Anh yêu em

    Slovene: ljubim te

    Finnish: Mä rakastan sua

    Indonesia: Saya cinta pada mu

    Irish: Taim i' ngra leat.

    Croatian: Volim te.

    Armenian: sirum em kez

    Azeri: seviräm sänä

    In Hindi, मैं तुमसे प्यार करता हूँ। (male speaker)
    मैं तुमसे प्यार करती हूँ। (female speaker)

    Turkish: Seni Seviyorum

    Ah well there are more but I’ll post them later….



(Post a new comment)

(Deleted post)

Re:
anaideia
2003-02-15 13:41 (link)
No not at all. Everyone is welcome. You will have someone to say all these things to one day soon I'm sure. In the meantime have fun collecting and selecting!

(Reply to this) (Parent) (Thread)


verilon
2003-02-16 06:26 (link)
For all these I envy you.. I am adding you to my friends list.

(Reply to this) (Thread)


(Anonymous)
2003-02-16 17:55 (link)
Te quiero is "I want you".

(Reply to this) (Thread)


anaideia
2003-02-16 18:21 (link)
True but to say Te amo is sometimes just like saying iniibig kita in tagalog. People more often will say Te Quiero in most latin speaking countries.

(Reply to this) (Parent) (Thread)

Spanish freak's explanation
evylpyxie
2003-02-16 23:16 (link)
Te quiero has a more endearing and almost idealistic connotation. Te amo seems so much more.. formal. My boyfriend (he's Mexican) and I almost always say "te quiero."

Literal translations are the enemy!

I want to learn Tagalog. Teach me?

(Reply to this) (Parent) (Thread)

Re: Spanish freak's explanation
anaideia
2003-02-17 08:26 (link)
If you speak spanish, everyday Tagalog will sound familiar to you. There are a lot of spanish words used. I suppose four hundred years of Spanish rule had to influence something!

The Chinese based words would be harder to teach though. BTW you are an extremely smart young lady! I hope that doesn't sound cheesy.

(Reply to this) (Parent) (Thread)

Re: Spanish freak's explanation
evylpyxie
2003-02-17 09:58 (link)
Not cheesy, and thank you. :)

My ex-roomate/best friend's ( thisisnotanexit ) parents' first language is Tagalog and I hear quite a bit of it when I go to visit her. The last time I was there I inspected the calendar and lo-and-behold I could read everything on it! I plan on visiting again this weekend but with the 2+ feet of snow I might not be able to make it.

Moving right along, I'm interested in all things langauge and Tagalog is an amazing mix that I really want to learn more about.

I thinkI will add you as a friend, if you don't object.

(Reply to this) (Parent) (Thread)

Re: Spanish freak's explanation
anaideia
2003-02-17 10:56 (link)
No not at all. I will add you as well.

(Reply to this) (Parent) (Thread)

Re: Spanish freak's explanation
priapus
2003-02-17 12:20 (link)
I suppose four hundred years of Spanish rule had to influence something!

Too true--according to linguists, Tagalog has practically been cut off from the rest of the Philippine family of languages because of the heavy Spanish influence. I'm just happy that it survived--a lot of Spanish colonies ended up losing their native tongues altogether.

(Reply to this) (Parent) (Thread)

Re: Spanish freak's explanation
anaideia
2003-02-17 12:53 (link)
There is a dialect in the Philippines that is nothing but Spanish. The sentences are just structured differently. Chebokano. I'm not sure if I am spelling that correctly. There was also a script used there that the Spaniards practically wiped out. In fact most Filipinos don't even know that they had a script that they used before the Spaniards came. What I find interesting is that the Philippines is second only to India in the amount of dialects spoken. The individual peoples/groups/tribes also have their own customs and cultures. Absolutely amazing that these people were all separate when the Spaniards decided to make them ONE people, but they were still able to maintain a lot of their own customs and traditions.

Another thing that I found while on a visit there with someone that only spoke english. There is not one Filipino dialect that is spoken or understood all over but English certainly is...

(Reply to this) (Parent) (Thread)

Re: Spanish freak's explanation
priapus
2003-02-20 10:26 (link)
There is a dialect in the Philippines that is nothing but Spanish.

Strictly speaking, I don't think Chavacano (this is the spelling I know, but I'm not sure either) isn't Spanish. To put it very crudely, it is "corrupted" Spanish because while it appropriates many Spanish and Spanish-sounding words, the structure is Filipino--Tagalog or Bisaya, depending on the region.

There was also a script used there that the Spaniards practically wiped out. In fact most Filipinos don't even know that they had a script that they used before the Spaniards came.

Have you heard of Antoon Postma? He's a Dutch scholar who studied the Mangyan people, eventually married a princess from the tribe, and revived interest in the Mangyan culture, including their form of writing. It's ironic that it took a Westerner to do this.

There is not one Filipino dialect that is spoken or understood all over but English certainly is...

Too true. The American public school system was too efficient. Some sectors now claim that the national language is "Filipino" but no one has any idea what that is, exactly, except that it supposedly subsumes every native language. I think it would be better to emulate Indonesia or Malaysia--the Philippine government should come up with a standardized vocabulary and grammar so that communication would be easier.

(Reply to this) (Parent) (Thread)

Hey, I know Spanish too, thanks!
(Anonymous)
2003-02-17 09:33 (link)
"Literal translations are the enemy!"

Ok. Now, Romantic pronunciamentos aside, again I say, te quiero is not what you would say to your mother. It's come to mean the same thing to our hearts as a fervid te amo/i>, fine, but the word is 'want' - which is why you would not say it your mother.


By the way - intended for the author of this journal - the poem found here http://www.blurty.com/talkread.bml?journal=preteenfascist&itemid=2735 was written by Robinson Jeffers, NOT preteenfascist.

(Reply to this) (Parent) (Thread)

Re: Hey, I know Spanish too, thanks!
evylpyxie
2003-02-17 09:51 (link)
I don't contend that semantically the base of 'te quiero' is the verb to want, I'm just saying that in pure pragmatic meaning, when translated, you would say 'I love you' rather than 'I want you.'

(Reply to this) (Parent) (Thread)

Re: Hey, I know Spanish too, thanks!
anaideia
2003-02-17 11:12 (link)
I wrote all that on the 15th of Feb the day after Valentine's day so I really wasn't talking about saying I love you to one's mother. I would say te quiero to a lover. Period end of story.

Have no clue why you are arguing anonymously in my journal from what i would assume is your home and place of employment given that there are two different IP's.

Umm you're checking out two journals. You're here in mine and linking to another. Why? If you are so interested in journals and commenting in them, get one, blurty is a free service so go on and get one.

If you have an issue with her using someone else's work please take it up with her not me. Thank you very much for stopping by but please drive on.

Next...

(Reply to this) (Parent) (Thread)

Beam says:
(Anonymous)
2003-02-18 11:02 (link)
Troll alert!

:)

-B

(Reply to this) (Parent) (Thread)


priapus
2003-02-17 12:35 (link)
Well, I kind of like the sound of "Iniibig kita." :) "Mahal kita" is a trifle overused--it can apply to practically anyone you're close to.

(Reply to this) (Parent) (Thread)


anaideia
2003-02-17 12:43 (link)
Actually i've never really said either. I do know that Filipinos are fond of endearments. Now that i absolutely adore. They are so carinoso/sa. My Filipino relatives call me "mataray pero napakalambing" mean's i'm ruthless but sweet at the same time. Ugg it makes sense in tagalog.

(Reply to this) (Parent) (Thread)


flamey
2003-02-19 02:09 (link)
hey. You've left a lot of cool comments in my journal, and the cunt_conscious community is fab, so I've added you :)

(Reply to this) (Thread)


anaideia
2003-02-19 09:13 (link)
Thank you but all the members are responsible for making it great and that includes you! I've also added you.

(Reply to this) (Parent) (Thread)


brown1eyed7girl
2003-02-19 10:17 (link)
i would like to join your community.

(Reply to this) (Thread)


anaideia
2003-02-19 10:46 (link)
it's open

(Reply to this) (Parent) (Thread)


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